Law & Order: Dick Wolf’s Divorce Drama


It looks like the creator of Law and Order has had his own legal drama…

Dick Wolf’s second wife, Christine Marburg, lost an appeal claiming that financial information was kept from her when she signed their divorce settlement.

A California appeals court rejected Christina’s claim. A claim that Wolf’s financial advisors, also the divorce mediators, manipulated her. She was trying to say she was ‘duped’ into signing the settlement, unaware of his $1 billion ongoing deal with NBC Universal. 

At the time of divorce signing, Christina claimed that financial statements indicated her husband was only worth $4 million. She only became aware of the deal whilst reading about it in the Los Angeles Times, after signing divorce papers.

Christine initially claimed, in 2004, that her ex-husband had hidden assets, before attempting to sue their then business advisors, without success.

Considering what is at stake in the process of divorce, spouses owe each other ‘a duty of the highest good faith and fair dealing …[where] neither shall take any unfair advantage of the other’

Source: https://people.com/tv/dick-wolfs-ex-christine-loses-appeal-tricked-signing-settlement-before-1-billion-payday/

What am I required to disclose to my spouse in the event of divorce?

According to California law, Under Family Code Section 721(b):

-in transactions between themselves, spouses are subject to the general rules governing guardianship relationships controlling the actions of persons in private relations with each other. 

-This confidential relationship imposes a duty of the highest good faith and fair dealing on each spouse, and neither shall take any unfair advantage of the other. 

-Providing each spouse access at all times to any books kept regarding a transaction for the purposes of inspection and copying.

(2) Giving upon request, true and full information of all things affecting any transaction that concerns the community property. Nothing in this section is intended to impose a duty for either spouse to keep detailed books and records of community property transactions.

(3) Accounting to the spouse, and holding as a trustee, any benefit or profit derived from any transaction by one spouse without the consent of the other spouse that concerns the community property.

Source: http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/codes_displaySection.xhtml?sectionNum=721.&lawCode=FAM

When it comes to your assets and finances, against tumultuous divorce proceedings, be proactive. Look at the services on offer at www.vincentmillerlaw.com.

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